Ultimate Guide to Running 10K: Training for 10k & How Many Miles is 10k?

10k to miles, couch to 10k
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How long is a 10k? How many miles is 10k? You are new to running and have probably heard of 10k, but you are perplexed and have no idea what it means.

There are 6.2 miles in 10km and that’s equivalent to 10,000 meters or 25 laps around a standard Olympic track.

The 10k is one of the most popular long distance race along with the half marathon and full marathon which requires optimal fitness level to complete it.

Running the 5k is not the same as running 10k, it is not as simple as “running double the distance only”. The effort to run 10k increases exponentially rather than linearly.

In this Ultimate Guide to Running 10k, you will learn the following:

  1. How Many Miles is a 10K Race?
  2. Average 10K Race Time For Beginners
  3. How Much Time Do You Need to Train For Your first 10K?
  4. From Couch to 10K – 10K Training Tips For Newbies
  5. 10K Training Plan For Beginners
  6. Beginners Tips for the 10K Race
  7. Extra Tips for Running the 10K
  8. How to Improve Your 10K Results?

Sounds exciting? Let’s begin!

1. How Many Miles is a 10K Race?

A kilometer is 0.62 miles, and a mile is 1.61 kilometers. You need to do some mental calculations when you see the distance markers during a 10k race.

Therefore, there’s 6.2 miles in a 10k race. Once you get the hang of it, it won’t be that tough to know how many miles you have ran in a 10k race.

On average, it takes about an hour to complete a 10k race. However, the elite runners takes about 28 minutes to complete it.

As a newbie runner, your main focus should be training to run the 10k race continuously without stopping with good form regardless of speed.

You can use this running pace calculator to help you determine your running pace for your next 10k race in an attempt to beat your personal best:

Pace Calculator

Running Pace Calculator

Type in the distance you plan to run and the time in which you’d like to run that distance to find your necessary pace.

Distance: miles

Time: : :

2. Average 10K Race Time For Beginners

The average 10k race time for beginners are as follows:

  • Male about 75-80 mins.
  • Female about 80-90 mins.

Well, beginners is defined as untrained person running + walking the 10k race.

With few months of training, you should be able to hit 60 mins or faster. If you are a little more serious in training, you can hit 50 mins or faster.

Running faster than 40 mins for a 10k puts you in the serious runners category.

Try to conserve as much energy as possible during a 10k race to prevent overexerting yourself too soon in the race.

Keep in mind that the average 10k race time for beginners may differ due to factors such as age, genetics, gender, fitness level and so on…

So What 10K Race Time Should I Aim For?

You can aim to for any 10k race time based on your current fitness level. If this is your first time running a 10k, then set realistic target and strive to achieve it.

If you achieved your target, then great. Otherwise, don’t be too hard on yourself, you did finish your first 10k race afterall.

Enjoy the 10k race and keep running to the finishing line – walk if you are too tired.

Don’t push yourself beyond your limits during your first 10k race or you risk injuring yourself.

3. How Much Time Do You Need to Train For Your first 10K?

Training for your first 10k race will take you months of regular training. Gotta commit to training or you won’t improve yourself.

The training usually starts with running shorter distance up to 5k before gradually increasing the volume and intensity for the 10k.

To get a rough idea of 10k race pace and the finishing time, take a look at this running pace chart:

running pace chart

This is just a prediction of targeted 10k race pace, not a must to achieve it. Everyone’s different aite?

If you managed to achieve it, great for you. Otherwise, don’t feel discouraged and just keep running!

Should Beginners Run 5K or 10K?

If you have never run a race in your life, running the 5k would be a great introduction for beginners. Running the 10k can be overwhelming for beginners.

You can even train for the 10k while running 5k since both are long distance and requires similar, but different training routine.

Are you ready to start training for the 5K?
Subscribe to receive a free 8-weeks training plan for you to go from couch to running 5K.
Includes email updates. You may unsubscribe at any time.

4. From Couch to 10K – 10K Training Tips For Newbies

This training plan can help you to go from couch to 10k, but there’s no guarantee you can successfully run a 10k.

Training for the 10k won’t be an easy jog at a park, you need to put in great effort during your training.

Disclaimer: Everyone responds to the training plan differently, it doesn’t mean you can successfully run a 10k even with six months of training. Besides, if you have existing health problems such as asthma, obesity, heart problems, etc, then consult your local physician prior to trying out this training plan.

Brisk Walk First

Try to do brisk walk first to get used to being active and moving.

Do 2 mins of fast walk and 1 min of slow walk for 10 sets. This is equivalent to 30 mins of brisk walking and you should have walked between 3-4k.

brisk walk for 10k to miles

Do brisk walk everyday; on the 2nd week onwards, you can try to up to 12 sets and gradually increase until you can brisk walk for an hour.

Once you are comfortable with walking at least an hour each session, you are ready to hop onto the next training level.

Try the Run and Walk Method

Now you are fitter than ever before, you can start with the run and walk method.

The run and walk method consist of running and walking as similar to how you did the brisk walk.

run walk for 10k to miles

Do 2 mins of running and 1 min of walking (recovery) for 10 sets. This is equivalent of 20 mins running and 10 mins walking, it should be more tiring than brisk walking.

This method helps you to improve your cardio while reducing the risk of pain, injuries and extreme fatigue.

The speed of your run during the running set should be comfortable pace – not too fast and not too slow. You know yourself better to gauge your speed.

At the end of your workout, you should feel tired and fun, but not exhausted nor fail to finish your run.

As you become fitter and fitter, you can gradually increase your running duration over the weeks.

Find Your Comfortable Running Pace

The best and easiest way to gauge your comfortable running pace is that you can hold a conversation while running.

If you can’t hold a conversation while running, it means the pace is too quick for you. Slow down and allow yourself to recover.

Progress at Your Own Pace

Everyone respond to training differently; some adapt quickly, some adapt slower, etc…

If you feel like you can’t keep up with the training plan, slow down, take a chill pill and repeat a week or two.

Don’t fret! You can even take some days off for recovery or even a week off. This is to allow your body to get used to the demands of running the 10k.

Make sure you have 1-2 days of rest days per week to prevent overtraining and burnout.

So what’s overtraining?

Overtraining occurs when you train beyond your body’s abilities to recover, leading to a decline in running performance.

Some symptoms of overtraining:

  • A loss of appetite.
  • Feeling awfully lethargic and unwilling to move.
  • Decline in running performance.
  • Easily annoyed or agitated.
  • Feeling immensely demotivated.

It is better to chill, relax and slow down your training than suffering pain and injuries.

5. 10K Training Plan For Beginners

The hardest part of running the 10k is taking the first step, yes, first step out of the door.

With this 10k training plan for beginners, it will help you to gradually build up your cardio endurance and fitness to go from couch to running 10k.

10k to miles, couch to 10k

In every week of training, you should expect to train about 3-5 days a week and 1-2 days complete rest or low intensity exercise for recovery.

First Month – 10K Training Plan for Beginners

Week One – Couch to 10K

Remember to warm up prior to starting your run…

  • Monday – Run 1 min, walk 2 mins, repeat 8 times.
  • Tuesday – Brisk walk for 30 mins.
  • Wednesday – Run 1 min, walk 2 mins, repeat 8 times.
  • Thursday – Rest or brisk walk for 30 mins.
  • Friday – Run 1 min, walk 2 mins, repeat 8 times.
  • Saturday – Home body weight exercise.
  • Sunday – Rest.

Week Two – Couch to 10K

  • Monday – Run 1.5 mins, walk 2 mins, repeat 6 times.
  • Tuesday – Brisk walk for 30 mins.
  • Wednesday – Run 1.5 mins, walk 2 mins, repeat 7 times.
  • Thursday – Rest or brisk walk for 30 mins.
  • Friday – Run 1.5 mins, walk 2 mins, repeat 8 times.
  • Saturday – Home body weight exercise.
  • Sunday – Rest.

Week Three – Couch to 10K

  • Monday – Run 2 mins, walk 2 mins, repeat 6 times.
  • Tuesday – Brisk walk for 30 mins.
  • Wednesday – Run 2 mins, walk 2 mins, repeat 8 times.
  • Thursday – Rest or brisk walk for 30 mins.
  • Friday – Run 2 mins, walk 2 mins, repeat 10 times.
  • Saturday – Home body weight exercise.
  • Sunday – Rest.

Week Four – Couch to 10K

  • Monday – Run 2 mins, walk 2 mins, repeat 8 times.
  • Tuesday – Brisk walk for 45 mins.
  • Wednesday – Run 3 mins, walk 1.5 mins, repeat 8 times.
  • Thursday – Rest or brisk walk for 45 mins.
  • Friday – Run 4 mins, walk 1.5 mins, repeat 8 times.
  • Saturday – Home body weight exercise.
  • Sunday – Rest.

Second Month – 10K Training Plan for Beginners

Week Five – Couch to 10K

  • Monday – Run 5 mins, walk 2 mins, repeat 8 times.
  • Tuesday – Brisk walk for 45 mins.
  • Wednesday – Run 6 mins, walk 1.5 mins, repeat 8 times.
  • Thursday – Rest or brisk walk for 45 mins.
  • Friday – Run 8 mins, walk 1.5 mins, repeat 6 times.
  • Saturday – Home body weight exercise.
  • Sunday – Rest.

Week Six – Couch to 10K

  • Monday – Run 8 mins, walk 2 mins, repeat 5 times.
  • Tuesday – Brisk walk for 45 mins.
  • Wednesday – Run 10 mins, walk 2 mins, repeat 5 times.
  • Thursday – Rest or brisk walk for 45 mins.
  • Friday – Run 12 mins, walk 2 mins, repeat 4 times.
  • Saturday – Home body weight exercise.
  • Sunday – Rest.

Week Seven – Couch to 10K

  • Monday – Run 15 mins, walk 1 mins, repeat 4 times.
  • Tuesday – Brisk walk for 45 mins.
  • Wednesday – Run 12 mins, walk 1.5 mins, repeat 5 times.
  • Thursday – Rest or brisk walk for 45 mins.
  • Friday – Run 18 mins, walk 2 mins, repeat 3 times.
  • Saturday – Home body weight exercise.
  • Sunday – Rest.

Week Eight – Couch to 10K

  • Monday – Run 25 mins, no walking.
  • Tuesday – Brisk walk for 60 mins.
  • Wednesday – Run 15 mins, walk 1.5 mins, repeat 5 times.
  • Thursday – Rest or brisk walk for 60 mins.
  • Friday – Run 18 mins, walk 1 mins, repeat 3 times.
  • Saturday – Home body weight exercise.
  • Sunday – Rest.

Third Month – 10k Training Plan for Beginners

Week Nine – Couch to 10K

  • Monday – Run 30 mins, no walking.
  • Tuesday – Brisk walk for 60 mins.
  • Wednesday – Run 20 mins, walk 1 mins, repeat 3 times.
  • Thursday – Rest or brisk walk for 60 mins.
  • Friday – Run 35 mins, no walking.
  • Saturday – Home body weight exercise.
  • Sunday – Rest.

Week 10 – Couch to 10K

  • Monday – Run 45 mins, no walking.
  • Tuesday – Brisk walk for 60 mins.
  • Wednesday – Run 22 mins, walk 1 mins, repeat 3 times.
  • Thursday – Rest or brisk walk for 60 mins.
  • Friday – Run 45 mins, no walking.
  • Saturday – Home body weight exercise.
  • Sunday – Rest.

Week 11 – Couch to 10K

  • Monday – Run 60 mins, no walking.
  • Tuesday – Brisk walk for 35 mins.
  • Wednesday – Run 30 mins, walk 1 mins, repeat 3 times.
  • Thursday – Rest or brisk walk for 35 mins.
  • Friday – Run 60 mins, no walking.
  • Saturday – Home body weight exercise.
  • Sunday – Rest.

Week 12 – Couch to 10K

  • Monday – Run 75 mins, no walking.
  • Tuesday – Brisk walk for 45 mins.
  • Wednesday – Run 30 mins, walk 1 mins, repeat 4 times.
  • Thursday – Rest or brisk walk for 45 mins.
  • Friday – Run 75 mins, no walking.
  • Saturday – Home body weight exercise.
  • Sunday – Rest.

With 12 weeks of hard work and effort of training, you should be able to run 10k or 6.2 miles continuously without stopping regardless of speed.

Disclaimer: It is not a guarantee that you can run 10k after 12 weeks, everyone’s body adapts and responds to a training plan differently.

However, if you think you are not ready to run/train for the 10k, you can check out our free 8-weeks training plan to help you go from couch to running 5k:

Are you ready to start training for the 5K?
Subscribe to receive a free 8-weeks training plan for you to go from couch to running 5K.
Includes email updates. You may unsubscribe at any time.

6. Beginners Tips for the 10K Race

Every runner is different from one another, there’s no magic formula on how to run the 10k race. However, with proper training, dedication, determination, diligence and discipline, you can successfully finish your first 10k race.

couch to 10k to miles

No matter how well and how much you prepared for the your 10k race, you can ruin it because of a small mistake.

Before you run your first 10k race, here are tips for the 10k race for beginners:

Register for your 10k race as early as possible

  • So that you have a clear target for you to work towards.
  • Fully commit to your training until you complete your race.

Rest and recover well ahead of your race

  • Your last training day should be 5-7 days before your race day, not a day before. Allow ample time for your body to rest and recover.

Physically and mentally prepare yourself the night before race day

  • Don’t stress yourself out by thinking of the outcome of the race, be confident in yourself and you will have a good outcome.
  • Aim for 6-8 hours of high quality sleep; excitement can make you sleepless.
  • Prepare all your running gear.

Pace yourself during your first 10k race

  • With sufficient training, you should have known your 10k race pace already.
  • Don’t get too excited and sprint from the get-go, keep it steady pace throughout the race.
  • Try to keep some juice for the final kick to the finishing line.

Eat more nutritious meal and skip on high-calories food

  • Never try anything new during race day.
  • Eat what you have been eating on your usual training days.

Before you push yourself, listen to your body

  • Your body is great at giving you signs before it experience any problems/injuries, listen to it.
  • Any acute pain is a red flag for you to stop immediately and seek medical assistance.
  • Running injuries are a pain in the ass.
  • Muscle sore should be gone after 1-3 days.
  • Minor problem such as blisters and side-stitch can be run through during the race.

7. Extra Tips for Running the 10K

Every runner is different from one another, there’s no magic formula on how to run the 10k. However, with proper training, dedication, determination, diligence and discipline, you can successfully run a 10k.

These are extra tips for running the 10k to achieve greater results:

  • Running isn’t about aerobic endurance only, do strength training to build muscles and improve your overall fitness.
  • Drink enough water during training and race day.
  • Consume healthy diet on a daily basis to provide your body with enough nutrients for recovery.
  • Sleep 6-8 hours for optimal recovery.
  • Improve your running technique.

8. How to Improve Your 10K Results?

Finally hitting your 10k personal best, but you want to further improve your 10k results?

Here are some realistic tips for you:

Are you ready to start training for the 5K?
Subscribe to receive a free 8-weeks training plan for you to go from couch to running 5K.
Includes email updates. You may unsubscribe at any time.

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